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Xela Pinkerton

  • Voice Type
    Soprano
  • Roles
    Countess Ceprano in
    Rigoletto

Xela Pinkerton

Xela Pinkerton, American born Guatemalan/American Soprano found music at a young age when she joined a guitar group that performed traditional Mexican songs called a “Rondalla” in Elementary School. It was there she first learned to appreciate songs in a foreign Language. Xela continued to be involved in many musical pursuits and went on to earn both a Bachelors of Music Degree and a Masters of Music Degree in Vocal Performance from the Converse College Petrie School of Music.



This October, Xela appeared as the High Priestess in Opera Carolina’s AIDA. Xela toured with Opera Carolina’s Opera Express program in the 2012-2013 season where she appeared as the Second Lady and Papagena in their production of The Magic Flute. As an Emerging Artist with Opera Experience Southeast in 2013, she sang the role of Nella in Gianni Schicci and continued her coaching with Dr. Arlene Shrut.



No stranger to the recital stage, this past September (2013) she presented joint recital with Donna Gallagher (Soprano) and in 2012, Xela presented a collaborative chamber music recital at Florida State University featuring selections of Dominick Argento’s To Be Sung Upon the Water for Voice, Clarinet/Bass Clarinet and Piano with Clarinetist Patrick Fulton. Most recently, Xela was a featured soloist in Dubois' The Seven Last Words of Christ by St. Paul’s United Methodist Church's Chancel Choir in Spartanburg, SC.



In 2008, she was awarded an Encouragement award by the Metropolitan Opera National Council (District of South Carolina). Xela’s other awards include Young artist Competition Winner 2007 (Converse College), First Place in category in the National Association for Teachers of Singing Competition in South Carolina 2010, 2007, 2006, and 2005, and Second Place in the Mid-Atlantic NATS Competition 2010, 2008, and 2005. Xela participated in Master Classes with Dr. Arlene Shrut (2013), Dr. Noemi Lugo (2008) and Benton Hess (2004).